Environment Agency urging Sikh community to reduce plastic waste

This is during the Bandi Chhor Divas celebration, which coincides with the COP26 climate summit

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The Environment Agency is encouraging the UK’s Sikh community to reduce plastic waste during religious celebrations.

It is working alongside its employee Sikh Fellowship and Eco-Sikh UK to display posters around Sikh Gurdwaras (places of worship) to limit plastic waste.

This follows its project earlier this year with the Muslim community during the Eid Festival.

Three posters in both English and Punjabi have been made, advising on the best ways to reduce avoidable plastic waste and encourage recycling during this year’s Sikh celebration Bandi Chhor Divas on 4th November – during COP26.

They focus primarily on food waste, candles, decorations and fireworks.

The Environment Agency is next looking to provide information to Hindu and Jewish communities to ensure religious festivals can be enjoyed and not have a negative impact on the environment.

Claire Horrocks, Environment Agency project lead, said: “Sikh families from across the world will soon come together to mark Bandi Chhor Divas – an important festival in the Sikh calendar that coincides with climate change conference COP26 this year.

“What better time to share positive ideas for sustainable celebrations and encourage people to reduce waste.

“Regardless of faith, everyone can learn from the messages in these posters, be kinder to our planet, and help protect the environment from further harm caused by plastic pollution.”

Eco-Sikh representative Amandeep Kaur Mann added: “This is an important collaboration between the Environment Agency and Sikh communities all over the UK to help get the message about climate change out there.

“Bandi Chhor Divas is a time to reflect on how our actions affect the world. Just as our Guru demonstrated selflessness in the way he helped others, we too should carry his message forward. This is by being responsible when celebrating so that we don’t harm the environment.”