Norway and Switzerland to explore carbon capture, storage and removal

It is part of their efforts to reduce and remove greenhouse gas emissions, with plans to explore cross-border market development for CCS and CDR

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Norway and Switzerland have struck a deal to strengthen co-operation on carbon capture and storage (CCS) and carbon dioxide removal (CDR).

It is part of their efforts to reduce and remove greenhouse gas emissions, with plans to explore cross-border market development for CCS and CDR.

The countries believe while CCS technologies may help reduce emissions in hard-to-abate sectors and contribute towards meeting carbon targets, CDR is necessary to counterbalance any remaining emissions to achieve net zero goals.

The Government of Switzerland published a roadmap in May 2022 which specifies how CCS and CDR can be developed progressively to contribute to the nation’s 2050 net zero goal.

It outlines the importance of international co-operation as the potential for CO2 storage in Switzerland in “likely limited”.

Simonetta Sommaruga, Swiss Minister of the Environment, Transport, Energy and Communications said: “Carbon Capture and Storage and Carbon Dioxide Removals are important contributions to climate protection and an opportunity for business and research. CCS should be used where greenhouse gas emissions are difficult to reduce and must not lead us to slacken in our primary goal of rapidly reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

“I thank all those who are committed to these technologies, especially Norway. I am pleased that our two countries are joining forces in this field and are moving forward together to accelerate cross border co-operation in CCS and CDR.”

Norway has more than 25 years of experience with CO2 storage under the seabed with the Snøhvit and Sleipne CCS projects, with the safety of storage confirmed by monitoring programmes and reservoir simulations that new projects can benefit from.

Under the Norwegian full-chain CCS project Longship, Northern Lights is building the transport and storage infrastructure with excess capacity to enable storage of CO2 from other European projects.

Terje Aasland, Norwegian Minister of Petroleum and Energy added: “For CCS to succeed, co-operation across borders is vital. CCS is a key priority for the Norwegian Government and has broad political support in Parliament. Longship is a game changer for CCS in Europe and Norway has extensive storage potential.”