Climate change could worsen your acne, say doctors

Spots could pop up more, as temperatures climb

Net Hero Podcast

Acne could get worse as temperatures increase, doctors claim.

In a recent study published in the International Journal of Dermatology, there have been claims that increased UV radiation from hotter climates could stimulate changes in the cutaneous microbiome – which is the reason for more red blemishes on our faces.

The dermatologists involved in the analysis claim there is ‘clear evidence’ that constant changes to weather conditions have an impact on skin microbiomes.

As more greenhouse gases have been released into the atmosphere, higher levels of UV radiation have become present.

The researchers state that this causes the gland that produces oil in our skin, the sebaceous glands, to multiply and produce more cells – leading to the development of more acne.

Lead dermatologist on the project, Markus Boos explained that with every 1°C increase in temperature, the UV dose your body takes increases by 2% – which is why skin is becoming more oily and therefore more spotty, as global warming continues.

Using 3D skin models, the research team witnessed how different climates and humidity levels impacted the state of human skin – and which bacteria flourished in different environments.

Aside from the impacts of climate change, the doctors said understanding these microbes and bacteria can also help in developing treatments for certain skin diseases.