DHL and Shell trial Bio-LNG trucks to cut carbon

The companies claim the LNG is made from agricultural waste and is 85% less carbon-intensive than diesel

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DHL and Shell have joined forces to pilot trucks powered by Bio-Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG).

The companies have stated that Bio-LNG is liquefied natural gas made from sustainable biomass and during the first five months of the trial, more than 87 tonnes of carbon emissions have been avoided.

This was for more than 89,900km travelled by a diesel truck and represents an 85% lower level of carbon-intensity than using a traditional diesel engine.

The Bio-LNG derives from agricultural waste and Shell is looking to offer a blend to its entire network in the Netherlands next year.

It will follow this by building a liquefication plant to produce the gas for the German market in 2023 – it has projected that if the plant produced 100,000 tonnes each year, it would reduce carbon emissions from freight by up to 1 million tonnes.

Uwe Brinks, CEO of DHL Freight, said: “The logistics industry is currently responsible for 11 percent of global carbon emissions. To fight against climate change, the transport sector needs true decarbonisation.

“For us at DHL Freight, sustainable fuel solutions are a key lever to change the fuel mix and ultimately reduce carbon emissions in road freight.”

“The pilot results indicate that Bio-LNG can already today reduce carbon emissions to contribute to the greenhouse gas reductions needed to reach the EU’s 2030 climate targets. That is very promising and good news for the sector,” added Fabian Zeigler, Managing Director of Shell Germany.