Sweet! M&M’s owner Mars commits to net zero emissions by 2050

Its new pledge includes switching to 100% renewable energy and ‘strongly linking’ executive pay to climate action

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Mars, Incorporated, the owner of brands including M&M’s and Ben’s Original, has announced its commitment to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions across its full value chain by 2050.

The company has set new science-based targets to achieve its goal, including all Scope 3 emissions such as those created by agriculture and suppliers, through to emissions from consumers using its household brands.

The new pledge includes switching to 100% renewable energy – Mars currently sources 100% renewable power for its direct operations in 11 countries, accounting for more than 54% of its global electricity needs, with plans to make the switch to a further eight countries by 2025.

The company has also committed to eliminate deforestation from its supply chain and challenge its 20,000 suppliers in the value chain to step up and set their own climate commitments, in addition to “strongly linking” executive pay to climate action.

Mars Chief Executive Grant F. Reid said: “The scale of global intervention must be bolder and faster. Climate change is already impacting the planet and people’s lives. To mitigate this real and tangible threat, the science tells us net zero targets must be broad in their reach, capturing emissions across the entire value chain and plans need to have material, interim targets. We can’t wait decades to see progress.

“However, all too often, this simply isn’t the case – and the gaps that exist in some net zero commitments risks undermining their credibility and even more importantly, the climate action movement. We can’t allow that to happen.

“To deliver meaningful impact and ensure it is fit for purpose, our net zero target covers our entire GHG footprint, from how we source materials through to how consumers use our products and we’re mobilising our entire business around taking action now and hitting interim targets every five years.

“We can’t use long term ambitions as an excuse for inaction and delay.”