Machinery electrification scheme helps Port of Tyne cut 700 tonnes of CO2 emissions

The initiative reduced the port’s diesel consumption by 260,000 litres, which is enough to power more than 80 homes for a year

Port of Tyne has rolled out a machinery electrification scheme that has helped it to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 700 tonnes in the last 12 months.

The port has been working on an initiative to electrify equipment, including a diesel-powered mobile harbour crane and other machines for bulk materials handling.

The initiative reduced the port’s diesel consumption by 260,000 litres, which is enough to power more than 80 homes for a year.

Port of Tyne has also invested in a new fleet of electric vehicles, LED lighting in every building and smart energy monitoring meters.

The switch to LED lighting alone across the port’s estate is estimated to have led to a saving of more than 2.5 million kWh of energy.

The port’s management team is also considering installing solar panels on warehouse buildings.

Matt Beeton, Chief Executive Officer at the Port of Tyne said: “To date, we have invested £2 million into clean energy projects, we have cut emissions to improve local air quality and launched a new clean energy business park for the renewable energy supply chain.

“All our clean energy investments reduce carbon consumption and lower our costs – going forwards we will be allocating up to 30% of our annual capex for more net zero improvements as we continue to prioritise green innovation and sustainability.

 

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